Time to Put our Heart Back Into it

“That is the simple secret, always take your heart to work.”

Meryl Streep

There are many things that I have enjoyed about my journey through life. And one of those things has been meeting so many people and learning about what they do for a living, what their hobbies are, their family history and where they are from.

Having traveled for most of my career, I have shared many planes, trains and automobiles with people who started out as strangers, but as we parted ways, we separated as friends and connected in some way.

What always stood out to me was the sense of pride, joy and enthusiasm many of the people I met had about their work. I have met software developers working on a unique program to improve disease management, teachers and professors who beamed when talking about their students, doctors, nurses, lawyers, bakers, athletes, actors, taxidermists, salespeople, CEOs, stay-at-home parents and so many others that it is impossible to list them all here.

And as I look back on some incredible memories of my time spent traveling, I am most grateful for the conversations with my seatmates as they shared their passion and heart for the work they did. They always took their heart to work. They went to work with a servant’s heart. They saw themselves as more than an employee, consultant or owner of a company. They saw themselves as being a difference-maker in some way…

Read More >

Which Side Are You On?

As I sat outside enjoying my morning coffee and reading the news, the calm and normalcy of my day was interrupted by several people walking in my direction. They were easy enough to notice, as they were wearing hats showing who they supported, and they had big buttons pinned to their jacket making it very clear whose side they were on. And if that wasn’t enough, they marched down the street shouting at all those who they believed were against them.

Thinking that the commotion would pass, and I could get on with a quiet cup of coffee and some reading time, things only became more interesting. Coming from the opposite direction was another group of people wearing hats and buttons, even carrying flags and pennants that made it clear that they were in complete opposition of the first group.

As I sized up the situation, it became abundantly clear that their paths would collide right in front of me. A few people seated at the other tables on the patio became a little anxious. Some seemed ready to jump in and pick a side. Looking at what both groups represented, I realized that I didn’t support either one. I didn’t have a dog in this hunt, as some might say.

As one group drew closer from my right, I could hear the taunting getting louder. As the other group approached from my left, the name-calling started. It appeared that things were going to get ugly and get ugly fast. Those that were a little anxious made the move back inside the coffee shop. And those customers who just a few minutes earlier were sitting quietly sipping on coffee began getting fired up and moved closer to the oncoming fray. With limited options, I was forced to decide. I secured my coffee with one hand, pocketed my phone with the other, and prepared to escape…

Read More >

Building Client Relationships

When it comes to building long-term relationships with clients, it’s very similar to building long-term friendships. In school, children are encouraged to make new friends by talking with others, inviting them to play, and being “nice” to them. In many business situations, clients often become more than clients. They become friends…not necessarily the kind you would invite to non-business gatherings, but people you truly care about and who care about you.

There is a feature in a local newspaper where readers are invited to review their favorite restaurant. The articles are wonderful publicity for the restaurants. One of the key elements I see repeated is that patrons know the names of the owners, hosts and/or servers. And, many of the restaurant workers know something about them as well. They know if the guests prefer coffee or tea with breakfast. They may even remember their favorite meal, asking if they want “the usual.

Put yourself in the seats of those guests for a moment. How would it make you feel to have your favorites automatically placed before you without having to explain your preferences? It would make you feel at home or as if you’re at the home of a good friend…someone who knows you well and wants you to have what you want. That type of response is the ideal when it comes to serving your clients’ needs and it can be created no matter what your product or service is.

You may think you’re in the business of selling automotive services, home remodeling or repairs, printing services, financial services, tutoring or signage, but you’re not. Even if your products are sold only to other businesses, the business doesn’t make the buying decision. A person does. You are in the people business. Learning to make people feel important and cared about will help you make both the initial sale and long-term sales over the course of your career.

Maybe you sell tires, not breakfast. Even so, you should introduce yourself to each client and give your name. Use your clients’ names in conversation during the sales process. Inquire about the use of the vehicle. Does the client have young children or a teenage driver? If so, safety will be an important issue to discuss with them. Do they have a home where some off-road driving is involved? Or, do they travel for business and need highway tires? All of these answers help you lead them to the best choice for them. Keeping a record of their answers will help you build long-term relationships.

No matter what your business is, every client should receive your best care during the sales process and after. During the initial sale, get them talking and take good notes. Enter the information into your client database. My colleague Harvey Mackay has a long list of details he requires his salespeople to gather about clients over time. This includes not just information required to do business, but a few personal details such as birthdays, whether or not they’re married, children’s names, and whether or not they have pets. That information is used to make contacts and to start conversations with clients after the initial sale.

People like to do business with people who are like them, who demonstrate that they care about them beyond making the sale, and who keep them in mind when something new that might be of interest to them comes along. That type of treatment makes clients feel important. They come to rely on businesses and salespeople they know they can trust to have their needs and interests at heart.

Copyright Tom Hopkins International, Inc.