What I Wouldn’t Give for Just Five More Minutes

How many times have we thought, “If I could only do that over again?” Whatever that is, there is always at least one thing, maybe several things, we wish we could take another shot at. There are conversations where we wish we could have said something differently or take back the words we spoke in haste or in an unprepared moment.

Oftentimes the do-over we want has more to do with our desire to do something better while seeking another attempt at fixing any mistake or regretful moment where we may have erred. We seek improvement so that the next time we are faced with the same opportunity or conversation, we handle it better.

Second chances are awesome, third chances are terrific, and fourth chances are tremendously amazing. And for a guy who has had way too many do-overs in life, I am grateful for those multiple chances to get it right.

As life goes on and people come and go in our lives, personally and professionally, and as we lose those we have loved, if we are not careful we may find ourselves saying something like, “What I wouldn’t give for one more day or even to have just five more minutes with that person.” Those are always tough moments as we wish that we would have made more of an effort to see them, spent a few extra minutes each week on the phone with them, or invested the time to listen and learn from them…

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Selling is Like Riding a Bicycle, To Stay in the Game You Have to Keep Moving

“Time kills deals!” I still remember the first time a sales manager said that to me. It was early in my selling career and my manager had just asked me about an opportunity that continued to push. First, it was a one-month push, then two months, and then it was over, and I had lost the sale.  

As a young and naïve salesperson, I lacked the sales savvy that would have helped me to see that there was never going to be a true opportunity to win the business. It wasn’t that I had just lost the sale to a ‘no decision’ or lack of budget, I had lost the deal to a competitor.  

Staying in the game or staying in any one deal does require that as salespeople we must keep moving, as long as we are moving in the right direction. And moving in the right direction means that we are continuing to add value to the conversations and helping our prospects make the best possible decision that will help them close a gap or achieve a goal. Even if it means that at this time, our solution is NOT the answer to their problem.  

Keeping our balance on a bicycle requires that we keep some type of momentum going. We can coast for a while, but sooner or later, we will have to do some pedaling too. Working hard at the beginning of our ride, and then keeping some positive pressure on the pedaling so that we do not stop. Or at least not stopping until we decide that we want to stop. In selling the same holds true. We have to know when to stay in balance, stay in motion, and keep pressing forward, but we also have to know when it’s time to hit the brakes and stop the ride.  

Looking back on my experiences all those years ago, I am grateful for my sales manager who let me know that “Time kills deals.” It changed the way that I have looked at each opportunity ever since. It taught me to apply some level of positive pressure along the way. Not aggressive or manipulative, but the right balance of assertiveness and value-added selling. The goal is to recognize that there is an opportunity to do business or not. Equally as important is to help our prospect to fully understand if our solutions can help fill a gap or achieve their goal.  

If we can disqualify the opportunity, meaning a “no” for now, and do so professionally, or they can disqualify us and our solution for now, it is a huge win for both of us. They get to spend time with other providers who can help them, and we get to move on to other prospects where we have a true sales opportunity.  

Final Thought: Newer salespeople are impacted by this more than seasoned sales veterans. Top performers know the importance of setting expectations, inspecting those expectations, and level-setting with their prospects to avoid this trap is crucial to sales success. When deals start ‘pushing’ out, and the prospect keeps asking for more information or more time, remember to pump the brakes, stop, get off the bicycle, and have a candid conversation with the prospect about what is happening, why, and reset expectations.  

Realize You are Amazing and Watch What Happens Next

Here we are, four weeks out from ringing in another New Year. Many of us can’t wait to put 2020 in the rearview mirror. These last 11 months are difficult to describe in one word, it’s even hard to describe them in just a few words without finding something negative, sad, or troubling to say, so yes, the rearview mirror analogy could be an excellent way to try and put it all behind us.

However, it’s only a good strategy if we make sure that we can shift our focus on what is in front of us, not only on what’s behind us.

“See, when you drive home today, you’ve got a big windshield on the front of your car. And you’ve got a little bitty rearview mirror. And the reason the windshield is so large and the rearview mirror is so small is because what’s happened in your past is not near as important as what’s in your future.” – Joel Osteen

Success is a funny thing as we can see others succeeding where we feel like we have not.

Whatever they touch turns to gold. They simply have a knack for being successful at whatever they endeavor to do. Even in a difficult COVID year, they were still able to meet with success. What’s the difference? The difference is in the way we see ourselves…

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